Thoughts on the Terrace

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In class, we discussed our feelings and ideas about the terrace. For me, more seating seemed to be the most necessary arrangement to get people to come here casually in bigger numbers. Ideally, we would have nice seating, but to keep it simple I thought of something light weight and simple that people can use and drag around. While they wouldn’t be the most comfortable, as a simple and short term solution I think it might work. It depends on what the people in the community want from the space, of course. As for specific uses of the space for children, I myself do not have any concrete ideas and possibly will not until we discuss it further. The chalkboard sounded like a good idea if done in a way to minimize inappropriate use. The terrace also seems like a nice, mini place to play soccer if someone brought their ball.

After seating, lighting if possible would be an important step. I’m not sure how feasible this would be, but I do like the ideas which we were shown that previous placemaking classes came up with, such as string lights. String lights are not very durable, though, but they are usually easy to install and take down as well as cheap. I might be wrong about the cost, though, because I am thinking of the United States after Christmas sales. I can’t wait to get to the terrace and begin the work to make the improve the terrace.

We also discussed the article by Anirban Adhya, a critical analysis of Jane Jacobs. While I am not well versed in the subject, I can see how complex the issues and theories are behind placemaking. One frustrating part of this is that placemaking, or aspects of it, feels like it should be common sense especially for people whose living depends on making spaces for people. Academic pretentiousness seen in some of the anecdotes frustrates me. We ignore “common” people when they’re often the most effected by “academic” choices, whether negatively or positively. They should have a say in these things, and academics need to acknowledge that informal, untrained people can have important things to say without the degree or the training, especially relating to the urban environment where they live.

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About valendbid

Trans history lover, history and spanish student at Hollins University.
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