Are playgrounds safe?

The article, The uses of sidewalks: assimilating children, was really interesting to me because it showed me a new outlook on the complex issue that was being presented. Are playgrounds the correct place to let a child play and hangout in? I have never looked at playgrounds and parks as a necessarily dangerous place. In the town I grew up in, we lived down the street from a local park and it was used frequently by children and families and during the day, it was never looked at as a dangerous or threatening place. However, at night time, it was a different story. Walking through parks at night was always just something that people knew was a sketchy thing to do. No matter how safe of a neighborhood you live in, parks are always questionable at nighttime. The article is suggesting that playgrounds are typically more prone to suspicious activities at all times of the day, due to lack of adult supervision. “The children have moved from under the eyes of a high numerical ratio of adults, into a place where the ratio of adults is low or even nil ” (The uses of sidewalks: assimilating children 77).  I normally would not agree with that, but the examples that are given throughout the article convince me otherwise. The fact that children are more mischievous and dangerous to each other with less adults around is definitely true. “Planners do not seem to realize how high a ratio of adults is needed to rear children at incidental play” (The uses of sidewalks: assimilating children 82). Responsibility for others plays a huge role in the safety of children in a community. While playgrounds lack some general security, it all relates back to placemaking and I believe that those areas always have the potential to be a healthy play space for children. If you look out for the well-being and safety of those in your community, you will end up with a happier and safer neighborhood.

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