Deterrents to Delinquency by Andrew L.

In, “The Death and Life of Great American Cities,” by Jane Jacobs we find a critique of the prejudices that many people of this world have in association to the concept of the cityscape. Jacobs begins her second chapter, “the use of sidewalks: safety,” by providing anecdotal evidence as a way to contend that dangerous streets are not a phenomenon that can be isolated unto a specific group or city. Instead delinquency is far more likely to be the by-product of human society as a general entity as opposed any specific factions of humanity.

Jacobs then continues to address a question that as a class we have been attempting to tackle: what can we do to make certain spaces more effective?

This question came up in Lorenzo’s, “The Shared City (Place-making in Borgo Bello)” and “Why True Neighborhood Building Requires the Dedication of a Few ‘Zelous Nuts.’” Here we see that all three authors describe how small and simple alterations to a city-scape can have incredibly large impacts on the general atmosphere of the city.

One of the major factors that can influence the gentrification of city space is its appeal to the public. The more people who use a public space the larger natural deterrent that exists to delinquency. The challenge is figuring out how to make people more comfortable in given spaces and how to navigate the governmental bureaucracy in order to legally implement said changes.

It’s not an easy task but the potential positive effects of even the smallest effective change; aesthetic, emotional, or spiritual is inconceivable.

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